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Institut für Wirtschaftsinformatik

Universität St.Gallen (HSG)

Das Institut für Wirtschaftsinformatik (IWI-HSG) ist mit seinen fünf Lehrstühlen eines der grössten Institute der Universität St.Gallen. Seit mehr als 30 Jahren forschen wir zu Geschäftsmodellen und der Anwendung digitaler Technologien.

Forschung

Mit dem St Galler House of Digital Business verfolgt das IWI einen ganzheitlichen Ansatz zur Strukturierung der Digitalisierung in Unternehmen. Wir sind in Forschung und Praxis international bestens vernetzt. Als eines der führenden Institute der Wirtschaftsinformatik in Europa stehen wir für hoch relevante Themen, von der Grundlagenforschung über angewandte Forschung bis hin zu Transfer und Weiterbildung.

Lehre

Neben der Forschung macht die Lehre einen wesentlichen Bestandteil unseres Engagements aus: Die Lehrveranstaltungen, die von unseren Dozierenden angeboten werden, sind für alle Studiengänge der School of Management von grosser Bedeutung. Der Erfolg unseres akademischen Nachwuchses steht für unsere Forschungs- und Lehrleistung.

Weiterbildung

Dem IWI-HSG angegliedert ist der Nachdiplomstudiengang Executive Master in Business Engineering (EMBE HSG), der CAS HSG Big Data and Artificial Intelligence for Managers, CAS Digital Innovation & Business Transformation, sowie das Executive Diploma HSG IT Business Management.

Lehre & Master in Business Innovation (MBI)

Das IWI-HSG bietet verschiedene Kurse auf Bachelor-, Master- und Doktorats-Stufe an und betreut das Master-Programm in Business Innovation (MBI)

Events

Research Talk Prof. Dr. Simon Trang, Assistant Professor, University of Göttingen: “The technology-behavior compensation effect: How beneficial and actively used technologies can counteract their societal goals”

18. October 2022

Standort: IWI-HSG, Müller-Friedbergstrasse 8, 9000 St.Gallen (Raum 52-7024) oder per Zoom

Datum: 18.10.2022, 14:00 bis 15:15

Prof. Dr. Simon Trang, Assistant Professor, University of Göttingen: “The technology-behavior compensation effect: How beneficial and actively used technologies can counteract their societal goals”

In search of solutions to societal health challenges, policymakers are increasingly turning to innovative apps as complements to existing non-technological interventions. Such apps developed for supporting users’ health are designed with the premise of being seen as beneficial and actively used. However, based on risk homeostasis theory, we theorize that these two classical design goals for effective information systems (IS) unintentionally foster risk compensation and lead to the neglection of other non-technical preventive health behaviors. Evidence from a multi-wave study regarding COVID-19 contact tracing apps confirms the existence of what we call the technology-risk compensation effect: those individuals who perceived the app to be highly beneficial or actively use it in return reduce other preventive health behaviors such as social distancing after app adoption. This technology-risk compensation effect implicates a hitherto overlooked tension between two established IS design goals and the successful exploitation of technology to support users’ health. We expand the established perspectives on dark sides of IS use by revealing a previously neglected type of unintended consequences and draw attention to the implications of this finding for research well beyond the health context.

Prof. Dr. Simon Trang holds the Chair for Information Security and Compliance (‘Juniorprofessur’) at the University of Göttingen. The focus of his work concerns the analysis and effective design of information security measures in companies and for a resilient society. He approaches the topic from a socio-technical perspective, in which information systems and information security are not understood as ends in themselves, but always in the interplay of technology, processes and actors. This includes the study of user behavior and psychology, technical, legal as well as strategic aspects. Prof. Trang and his team have received various grants from renowned public institutions such as the BMBF, the BMWK, the BMG and the Volkswagen Foundation. His work has been published in journals such as the Journal of the Association for Information Systems, the European Journal of Information Systems, and Information Systems Frontiers, among others.

Simon Trang | LinkedIn

Prof. Dr. Simon Trang – Georg-August-Universität Göttingen (uni-goettingen.de)

Research Talk Prof. Dr. Kai Spohrer, Associate Professor of Information Systems, Frankfurt School of Finance & Management: “And No One Gets the Short End of the Stick: A Blockchain-Based Approach to Solving the Two-Sided Opportunism Problem in Inter-Organizational Information Sharing”

14. November 2022

Standort: IWI-HSG, Müller-Friedbergstrasse 8, 9000 St.Gallen (Raum 52-7024) oder per Zoom

Datum: 14.11.2022, 14:15 bis 15:30

Prof. Dr. Kai Spohrer, Associate Professor of Information Systems, Frankfurt School of Finance & Management: “And No One Gets the Short End of the Stick: A Blockchain-Based Approach to Solving the Two-Sided Opportunism Problem in Inter-Organizational Information Sharing”

The threat of opportunistic behavior is an enduring problem for inter-organizational information sharing. The two sides of opportunism in inter-organizational information sharing – information poaching by the information recipient and information manipulation by the information provider – cause high transaction costs and sometimes preclude information sharing relationships altogether. Existing organizational and technological countermeasures against the two-sided threat of opportunism can either not reliably preclude information poaching and manipulation or address only one of them at a time. We develop four design principles for a blockchain-based system that permits information sharing based on sensitive data in inter-organizational business transactions without revealing the actual data. Thus, our solution simultaneously precludes both information poaching and information manipulation, enabling a novel class of information sharing. We instantiate our design principles in a prototype within a multi-firm research consortium for wear-based leasing contracts for machine tools. An evaluation shows that organizations are willing to engage in more inter-organizational information sharing and draw on more sensitive data when using the proposed prototype compared to traditional inter-organizational information systems. Our study contributes to research on opportunism in inter-organizational information sharing and confidentiality in blockchain networks.

Kai Spohrer is Associate Professor of Information Systems with the Frankfurt School of Finance & Management. In his research, he applies qualitative and quantitative methods as well as design science to understand and shape the development and use of information systems. He is particularly interested in questions related to collaboration and coordination in information systems development, IT healthcare, and blockchain systems.

Digital transformations force organizations to develop and maintain innovative digital products and services. Thus, effectively managing these activities and supporting them with appropriate technology at various levels is crucial for organizational success. To support these goals, Kai Spohrer conducts research at several levels, ranging from psychological explanations of biased behavior in AI system users over team-level analyses of software development methods to investigations into the interactions of software architecture and organizational structure in development organizations. His research has appeared and is forthcoming in Information Systems Research, Journal of Management Information Systems, IEEE Transactions of Software Engineering, and others.

Prior to joining Frankfurt School, Kai Spohrer was Assistant Professor at the Business School of the University of Mannheim where he completed his habilitation on digital innovation in healthcare and the software industry, focusing particularly on agile development, design, and use of information systems. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Mannheim for his dissertation on collaborative quality assurance and team cognition in software development teams. Over the years, he has spent time as a student and visiting researcher at institutions such as the University of Arkansas, Washington State University, and Universidad Politécnica de Madrid. He is a founding member and the director of content and media of the AIS special interest group “Advances in Sourcing”.

Kai Spohrer | LinkedIn

Prof. Dr. Kai Spohrer | Frankfurt School (frankfurt-school.de)